‘Dark energy’ — Life beneath the seafloor: Scientists present recent findings on the subsurface biosphere

ScienceDaily: Oceanography News


What goes down must come back up: Effects of 2010-11 La Niña on global sea level

Posted: 19 Nov 2012 02:29 PM PST

In 2010-11, global sea level fell nearly a quarter inch. But, when it comes to long-term sea level, what comes down must eventually come back up.

‘Dark energy’ — Life beneath the seafloor: Scientists present recent findings on the subsurface biosphere

Posted: 19 Nov 2012 01:34 PM PST

Scientists affiliated with the National Science Foundation (NSF) Center for Dark Energy Biosphere Investigations (C-DEBI) will discuss recent progress in understanding life beneath the seafloor at the American Geophysical Union (AGU) fall meeting, held in San Francisco from Dec. 3-7, 2012. Once considered a barren plain dotted with hydrothermal vents, the seafloor and the crust beneath it are humming with microbial life — with “dark energy”. Once considered a barren plain dotted with hydrothermal vents, the seafloor and the crust beneath it are humming with microbial life — with “dark energy,”

New energy technologies promise brighter future

Posted: 19 Nov 2012 12:13 PM PST

Creative new technologies could change our sources of energy, change our use of energy, and change our lives.

Invisibility cloaking to shield floating objects from waves

Posted: 19 Nov 2012 07:45 AM PST

A new approach to invisibility cloaking may one day be used at sea to shield floating objects – such as oil rigs and ships – from rough waves. Unlike most other cloaking techniques that rely on transformation optics, this one is based on the influence of the ocean floor’s topography on the various “layers” of ocean water. At the American Physical Society’s (APS) Division of Fluid Dynamics (DFD) meeting, being held November 18-20, 2012, in San Diego, Calif., Reza Alam, assistant professor of mechanical engineering at the University of California, Berkeley, will describe how the variation of density in ocean water can be used to cloak floating objects against incident surface waves.
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